Digital opportunities


In this age of digital cameras and image processing, technical know-how is becoming more and more important. Modern technology is essentially turning everyone into a photographer, but there are some things that you can’t get at the touch of a button, and that’s a trained eye and the idea behind a motif.

The craft of my chosen profession has changed considerably as a result of digitalization. I’m referring to photography itself – but digitalization also means that I can respond to customer requests more quickly and with a greater degree of flexibility.

Nick Ballon (born 1976) is an internationally renowned photographer with BritishBolivian roots. For prism he shot photographs for the title page and title story.

Chemical baths and darkrooms are things that only a tiny group of highly dedicated photographers still work with. In this age of digital cameras and image processing, technical know-how is becoming more and more important. Modern technology is essentially turning everyone into a photographer, but there are some things that you can’t get at the touch of a button, and that’s a trained eye and the idea behind a motif. A unique perspective is the key – whether you’re shooting analog or digital. For my personal projects I often use an analog camera, while for most of my commissions I prefer a medium-size digital camera. Both techniques have their appeal, but everything gets digitalized in photography at some point – at the latest during post-production. But I consciously use this only sparingly, though it does help me to perfect my craft. Mainly I adjust the colors. I prefer muted tones and not too much contrast.

Digitalization has revolutionized the world in almost all aspects. But that doesn’t mean that it simply replaces everything that’s gone before. Often it offers totally new possibilities. It makes things easier for people, and it facilitates communication.

Yours,
Nick Ballon